Anthropology

Anthropology

A.A.

The 60-credit Anthropology A.A. degree program will introduce you to the field of anthropology as a whole. You will be encouraged to find your own anthropological direction as you prepare for more rigorous future education.

The comprehensive study of humanity, anthropology features four subfields: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Connecting these subfields is a series of approaches that empower you to become comparative in scope, evolutionary in depth, and holistic in perspective.

As a student in this A.A. degree program, you will complete the Required Anthropology Emphasis Curriculum (13 credits), General Electives (18 credits), Health/Physical Education coursework (2 credits), and General Education Requirements (27 credits) for a credit total of 60.

Note: To earn the A.A. with Emphasis in Anthropology, you will need to complete all requirements for a general A.A. degree while incorporating the specific requirements of your chosen emphasis. Careful planning with an academic advisor or counselor as well as with a member of the Anthropology department is strongly advised to tailor the emphasis to meet the requirements of your chosen four-year college or university.

Full-time schedule recommendation

See how to schedule your classes each semester to complete your degree in two years.

 Full-Time Recommended Course of Study

Part-time schedule recommendation

Recommendations for a part-time schedule are included in the Anthropology Program Planning Guide (see below).

2022-2023 Required Courses

Required Anthropology Emphasis Curriculum

Course # Course Name Credit(s)
ANTH 1110
Cultural Anthropology
3

Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 05, 08
Introduces students to the anthropological subfield focused on human culture. Culture is that complex whole which includes knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom, and any other capabilities and habits acquired by individuals as a member of society. Examines the tension between the claim that culture can be both universal as well as particular. This class offers a broad survey allowing for this comparison of universals and particulars around the world, including larger concepts of identity, cultural manifestation, operation of institutions, and issues of inequality and globalization.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022

ANTH 1130
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
3

Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 03, 10
Introduces the biological anthropology field, one of the four sub-fields within anthropology. Sometimes called physical anthropology, biological anthropology is the study of our collective human origins. Students will accomplish this through three main areas: study of biological evolution, including the forces of evolution and cellular biology; comparing primate and human physical and behavioral practices; and by examining hominid evolution from groups beginning four to five million years ago through today as they are shaped by environmental and cultural stimuli. Study will be done through a variety of in class discussions and lectures as well as simulated or dry lab activities. Additionally, students will learn how modern cultural implications impact our evolution and environment today. May be paired with ANTH 1131 to fulfill a lab science requirement.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022

ANTH 1131
Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab
1

Course Outline
Credits: 1
MNTC Goal Areas: 03
Provides an optional lab with hands on experience for the lecture sections of ANTH 1130 (Introduction to Biological Anthropology). The lab covers scientific method, cell biology and DNA, principles of inheritance, human variation, population genetics, the human skeleton, primate classification, primate behavior, bipedal adaptation and comparative analysis of hominin features including Australopithicines and Homo. This course must be paired with ANTH 1130 to fulfill a lab science requirement.

Prerequisites:

  • ANTH 1130 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Corequisites:
  • ANTH 1130 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Future Offering:
  • Fall 2022

ANTH 1101
ANTH 1120
ANTH 1150
ANTH 1160
ANTH 2110
ANTH 2130
ANTH 2140
Introduction to American Culture    OR

Introduction to Archaeology    OR

Introduction to American Indian Cultures    OR

Migrants and Refugees    OR

Peoples and Cultures of Latin America    OR

Introduction to Medical Anthropology    OR

Humans and the Environment
Choose two of the course options above.
6

Introduction to American Culture
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 07, 08
Explores the cultural variety that comprises the current American population and the issues that drive Americans today. This course provides an introduction to American culture with emphasis on those who have arrived in the past 200 years including their transitions, mobility, and interchange. Classroom discussions, lectures and activities will focus on the effects of each succeeding immigrant group on American culture through the operation of American Dominant Culture, worldview, and institutions; with focus primarily on the role of the individual and consumerism within American society.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Introduction to Archaeology
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 05, 07
Introduces students to the archaeological field and profession. Archaeology, one of the four sub-fields within anthropology, is the study of human material culture and is typically done by examining objects and locations left behind by various groups throughout human history. Students will examine the history, methods, and basic theories of archaeology. Additionally, students will learn how the archaeological profession is conducted today and apply this to highlighting issues of community development and expression, subsistence, status, consumption, gender, and other contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022

Introduction to American Indian Cultures
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 07, 10
Introduces students to American Indian cultures from an anthropological perspective. This is accomplished through three primary avenues: a broad survey of cultures prior to European colonization; the historical-cultural experiences that contributed to present day Native American communities; and finally issues in modern American Indian communities and their relationships with anthropologists. Specific North American culture areas from the Midwest and Great Plains, through the Southeast and Southwest will be surveyed.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Migrants and Refugees
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 05, 08
Examines the dimensions of transnational migration and refugee displacement in the US and globally. This course provides an introduction to the concepts, themes and dynamics that anthropologists consider when examining the lives of social groups who voluntarily and involuntarily leave their home country. Students will examine and apply anthropological analyses to ethnographic case studies of migration and refugee experiences. Classroom discussions, lectures and activities will explore worldwide political, economic and social issues to try to understand the current period of widespread migration and displacement holistically.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 06, 08
Introduces the diverse contemporary cultures of Latin America and the factors that influence peoples' lives and cultural expressions. Course topics include colonization, globalization, religion, identity and ethnicity, social movements, migration, and the relationships between culture and gender, language, art, music, traditional arts and crafts, and the environment. Throughout the course, we will also explore the roles that anthropologists have played in Latin America.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022

Introduction to Medical Anthropology
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 08, 09
Growing specialization within anthropology, medical anthropology draws upon socio-cultural, linguistic and biological anthropology to understand those factors that affect human health and illness. This course introduces students to this field of study and the cross-cultural, political and ethical considerations involved in solving real-world problems related to human health and illness. Through the examination of case studies students will learn ways to apply principles of medical anthropology to solve contemporary issues facing our communities. Prerequisites: None, but ANTH 1110 or ANTH 1130 recommended, but not required.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Humans and the Environment
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 05, 10
Introduces the complex relationship between humans and the environment. Students will analyze how changing paleo-climates shaped human evolution and explore the interdependence between humans and the environment today. Students will study a variety of contemporary and historical cultural groups in terms of their production, consumption, social organization, and worldview. Students will learn how successful adaptation to climate and geography, the conservation of species, and management of available resources have contributed to survival or collapse of societies in documented cases. Students will interpret what humanity can learn about sustainability from these cases and the empirical knowledge systems of traditional cultural groups.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Total Credits in Required Anthropology Emphasis Curriculum 13

General Electives

Course # Course Name Credit(s)
General Education Credits (Any MnTC Goal Area)
12



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

ANTH 1100
Introduction to Anthropology
3

Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 05, 08
Introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and language. Anthropology, is the study of humanity. Within each subfield are various, practical applications which are collectively termed applied anthropology. Students will learn to identify and apply anthropological study methods. Included within this knowledge will be the application of holistic, comparative, and evolutionary avenues of anthropological inquiry into the issues and institutions that affect our complex, modern lives.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022

ANTH 2120
Field Experience in Archaeology
3

Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 05, 07
Introduces students to the archaeological field and the American Cultural Resource Management (CRM) profession. Archaeology, one of the four sub-fields within anthropology, is the study of human material culture and is typically done by examining objects and locations left behind by various groups throughout human history. This course gives students the opportunity to more closely examine how archaeology is applied primarily through implementation of the National Historic Preservation Act and the resulting creation of CRM as the mainstay of employment within archaeology today. Students will spend approximately half of their time in the classroom with the remainder in the field; observing and experiencing various archaeological sites, museums, historical societies, etc. Students will learn how the archaeological profession highlights issues of community engagement, development, and expressions. Prerequisites: Recommended ANTH 1120.

Prerequisites:

  • ANTH 1120 Introduction to Archaeology

Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Total Credits in General Electives 18

General Education Requirements

Course # Course Name Credit(s)
ENG 1108
Writing And Research Skills
4

Course Outline
Credits: 4
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 02
Provides instruction and practice in reading, researching, and writing for college. Prerequisites: Recommended by Accuplacer assessment or grade of C or higher in READ 93/94 and ENG/EAP 99.

Prerequisites:


Corequisites: None
Future Offering:
  • Fall 2022

ENG 1111
ENG 1114
ENG 1130
Research Writing    OR

The Research Paper    OR

Writing and Research For the Professions
3

Research Writing
Course Outline
Credits: 2
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 02
Students will analyze primary and secondary sources and develop formal research writing in students' academic and/or professional disciplines including EMS, Paralegal, and Criminal Justice. Prerequisites: ENG 1108 or equivalent, with grade of C or better.

Prerequisites:

  • ENG 0101 Composition I: Expository Writing
  • ENG 1108 Writing And Research Skills

Corequisites: None
Future Offering:
  • Fall 2022
  • Spring 2023

The Research Paper
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 02
Emphasizes critical analysis of fiction or nonfiction texts, at least one book-length, resulting in a research paper that reflects analysis and synthesis of multiple sources. Prereq: Grade of C or higher in ENG 1108.

Prerequisites:

  • ENG 0101 Composition I: Expository Writing
  • ENG 1108 Writing And Research Skills

Corequisites: None
Future Offering:
  • Fall 2022
  • Spring 2023

Writing and Research For the Professions
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 02
Emphasizes critical audience analysis of professional texts across the disciplines, at least one book length, resulting in a professional research proposal, feasibility study, or report that reflects analysis and synthesis of multiple sources, persuasion, and students' mastery of professional and audience analysis, business writing, researching, and evaluative skills. Prerequisites: ENG 1108 or equivalent, with grade of C or better.

Prerequisites:

  • ENG 1108 Writing And Research Skills

Corequisites: None
Future Offering:
  • Fall 2022

COMM 1100
COMM 1110
COMM 2230
Interpersonal Communication    OR

Public Speaking    OR

Small Group Communication
3

Interpersonal Communication
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 07
Is a course that helps students recognize that we live and work in relationship with others and must communicate effectively with them to achieve our goals. This class helps students acquire the skills to effectively communicate with family members, intimate others, co-workers, friends, and acquaintances. After reviewing relevant interpersonal theory, students will examine and identify their own communication attitudes and behaviors. Students will also learn and apply techniques for improving communication in their relationships through active practice. Students will participate in multiple activities, both in and outside the classroom setting, to build their interpersonal communication skills. This course is open to all students and meets the Minnesota Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board (PELSB) 8710.2000, Subp. 7, Standard 6C, D, F, & G.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022
  • Spring 2023

Public Speaking
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 02
Is the introductory study of the theory and practice of public speaking. Public presentation skills are required for individuals to be successful in our workplaces, communities and many other contexts in today's society. Students will learn about the different types of public speeches commonly encountered and learn how to research, organize and write their ideas into clear and understandable forms of public communication. Students will also practice the delivery skills needed to present ideas effectively. Students will be required to speak and participate often and will also be required to present their speeches in a classroom setting with an audience of their peers and an instructor.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022
  • Spring 2023

Small Group Communication
Course Outline
Credits: 3
MNTC Goal Areas: 01, 02
Introduces students to the practice and theory of communicating in small group settings. Working in groups is an integral part of living in today's society. Community and workplace situations require us to be able to lead, participate, and follow effectively. Participating in this course will assist students in developing the leadership, conflict management, problem solving and discussion skills necessary to function in group settings. Students will apply small group communication theory in small, task-oriented groups and develop presentation skills to showcase their understanding of what it means to be an effective group member. Evaluating the effectiveness of their own and others' group communication behaviors is also required.

Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering:

  • Fall 2022
  • Spring 2023

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 3b)
3



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 4)
3



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 5)
non-ANTH
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 6a)
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 6b)
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 6)
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 7)
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

General Education Credits (MnTC Goal 9)
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Total Credits in General Education Requirements 27

Health/Physical Education

Course # Course Name Credit(s)
Health and PE
2



Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Future Offering: None

Total Credits in Health/Physical Education 2
Total Credits: 60
‡ Select General Education electives from specified MnTC goal area or from any MnTC goals if none specified.